We attended a trade day at Farnborough on Friday 20th July and it was a spectacular event.  Hosted by ADS Group (Aircraft/Defence/Space).  The show organisation was faultless and thoroughly enjoyable.

ADS reported the following successes:

  • US $192bn in deals were announced, up by $67.5bn on the 2016 Airshow.
  • Our most international show yet with around 100 countries in attendance.
  • More than 80,000 trade visits through the gates.
  • The first FIA with new Hall 1 facility
  • 2,000+ visitors in our FINN theatres 

In the afternoon there were the flying displays with of course the WW2 memorial flight of a Spitfire, Hurricane and Lancaster, Red Arrows, a daredevil display by a Red Bull team, the Harrier Jump-Jet and demonstrations of civil aircraft capabilities.

We made some very useful connections but realised that the vastness of the show couldn’t be covered in a single day.  It was a very good day.

The public days at the weekend were very well attended with the added advantage of fine and dry weather, a stark contrast from 2016 when day one had to be abandoned because of heavy rain and thunderstorms

The official blog for independent Management Training
Consultancy, Quality Matters Limited.

To meet the exacting standards in aircraft, space and defence the major aircraft manufacturers and IAQG (International Aerospace Quality Group) developed AS9100; based on ISO9001:2008 and upgraded with ISO 9001:2015 this standard (now at Rev D) fills the gap between military standards and the commercial ISO9001 quality management standard. It makes good sense to have one aircraft, space and defence standard for conformity to best practice; AS9100 is that standard.

AS9100 v ISO 9001

Manufacturing an item as complicated and critical as an aircraft or space vehicle requires special attention during all the production processes. A great deal of attention is placed on documentation and drawing control to ensure that the current revision of engineering drawings, bills of material and test and inspection specifications is being used. This ‘configuration control’ is covered in far more depth than ISO9001, as is identification and traceability. Following an incident or accident documents are always quarantined immediately by an air accident or incident board of enquiry.

Risks and opportunities are highlighted in the standard. The AS9100 standard also provides for key characteristic management in both material, and process control. Clearly there is a good deal of emphasis on the design and development of the final structure as well as components used in that structure, the AS9100 standard includes additional requirements in design and development functions. Explanatory notes are included for both design and development verification and validation, highlighting traditional areas of emphasis. Additionally, AS9100 provides information on areas of verification, documentation and validating testing and results.

One area which receives greater attention is the inspection area, particularly first off in a batch of items and subsequent inspection. The standard also requires actions to be taken when it all goes wrong. Any faulty part, which is designated as scrap, must be put beyond use before disposition.

This standard can be applied in the following forms:

  • AS 9100 – Quality Management System requirements for Design and/or manufacture of aircraft, space or defence products 
  • AS 9110 – Quality Management System requirements for maintenance and repair operations 
  • AS 9120 – Quality Management System requirements for Stockists and distributors. 

Assessment and certification is carried out by properly accredited and competent assessors. The assessment is of necessity, more in depth than ISO9001 and the reporting is far stricter. The assessor checks every element of the standard against the organisation’s documented information system; at the end of the assessment a decision is made to pass or require additional work to be carried out. One major difference in the assessment is that no corrective action may take place during the assessment, unlike ISO9001. Any CAP (corrective action plan) must take place afterwards and be submitted through the OASIS system. Once all CAP items have been accepted a certificate can be issued.

Inevitably organisations who achieve certification to AS9100 will then require their sub-contractors and external providers to achieve the standard as well.

Once accredited these organisations are featured in OASIS (the IAQG Online Aerospace Supplier Information System).

Quality Matters can assist organisations to achieve certification to these standards and provide internal audit services.

The official blog for independent Management Training
Consultancy, Quality Matters Limited.

The deadline for transition to ISO 9001:2015, ISO 14001:2015 and the Aircraft, Space and Defence Standards AS 9100D, AS9110C and AS 9120B is 15 September 2018.

While this may seem a long way off it is important to remember that the transition and correction and acceptance of any corrective action identified by an assessor must be completed satisfactorily by the deadline date.

Both UKAS for the quality and environmental standards and IAQG for the Aircraft, Space and Defence standards have made it very clear that there can be no extensions or relaxation of the deadlines for any reason.  Any organisation missing the deadline will be deregistered.  There is no appeal mechanism.  The organisation will lose certification and will have to start from scratch to regain certification.  There is a fairly big cost involved in this and loss of certification in the intervening period may result in inadmissibility for tenders and/ or cancellation of contracts requiring one or more of the standards as a mandatory requirement.

The revised Standards are quite different in their approach and require more involvement from Senior Directors and Managers.  This can be a problem where the requirement for understanding and operating the standards has, historically, been delegated to others lower down the organisation.

We at Quality Matters have helped a number of Clients to effect the transition and while we have sought to make it simple to use there have been a number of top management who have been  forced to become engaged in the systems.

The Aircraft, Space and Defence Standards were issued at the end of 2016 but the transition dates have been aligned with the ISO standards. I.E.  15 September 2018 ; a fairly tight schedule.

We urge all holders of certification that are affected by these changes to ensure that their transition is carried out in good time to avoid loss of certification.  Remember you may be ready, but assessors are committed to the stage one for transition followed by stage two on site.  Availability may be a governing factor.

The official blog for independent Management Training
Consultancy, Quality Matters Limited.

The deadline for transition to ISO 9001:2015, ISO 14001:2015 and the Aircraft, Space and Defence Standards AS 9100D, AS9110C and AS 9120B is 15 September 2018.

While this may seem a long way off it is important to remember that the transition and correction and acceptance of any corrective action identified by an assessor must be completed satisfactorily by the deadline date.

Both UKAS for the quality and environmental standards and IAQG for the Aircraft, Space and Defence standards have made it very clear that there can be no extensions or relaxation of the deadlines for any reason.  Any organisation missing the deadline will be deregistered.

There is no appeal mechanism.  The organisation will lose certification and will have to start from scratch to regain certification.  There is a fairly big cost involved in this and loss of certification in the intervening period may result in inadmissibility for tenders and/ or cancellation of contracts requiring one or more of the standards as a mandatory requirement.

The revised Standards are quite different in their approach and require more involvement from Senior Directors and Managers.  This can be a problem where the requirement for understanding and operating the standards has, historically, been delegated to others lower down the organisation.
We at Quality Matters have helped a number of Clients to effect the transition and while we have sought to make it simple to use there have been a number of top management who have been  forced to become engaged in the systems.

The Aircraft, Space and Defence Standards were issued at the end of 2016 but the transition dates have been aligned with the ISO standards. I.E.  15 September 2018 ; a fairly tight schedule.

We urge all holders of certification that are affected by these changes to ensure that their transition is carried out in good time to avoid loss of certification.  Remember you may be ready, but assessors are committed to the stage one for transition followed by stage two on site.  Availability may be a governing factor.

The official blog for independent Management Training
Consultancy, Quality Matters Limited.

The IAQG have announced that the revised AS 9100 series of standards, which use ISI 9001 as the core requirements are going to be published in 2016. There will be a transition period until 15 September 2018.  Any organisation not transitioning to the revised standards by that time will automatically be deregistered.

The revised standards use the Hi Level Annex SL format produced for all new ISO standards and comprise ten clauses.

  1. Scope
  2. Normative references
  3. Terms and definitions
  4. Context of the organisation
  5. Leadership
  6. Planning
  7. Support
  8. Operation
  9. Performance evaluation
  10. Improvement

Some of the requirements deemed unnecessary in ISO 9001 have been reinstated in AS 9100 These include:

  • management representative is required
  • documented information with items to be identified (Quality Manual)

In addition, a number of requirements have been added:

  • Protection from counterfeit products, 
  • Product safety (awareness and compliance)
  • Computer back up secured
  • Project management
  • Measures of on-quality and on-time delivery
  • Stakeholders
  • Transfer of work
  • Reviews of requirements related to products and services coordinated with applicable functions
  • Actions to be taken when not meeting customer requirements
  • Handling obsolescence
  • Changes
  • Controls of external providers and sub-tier providers
  • Additional evaluation of data and test reports
  • Controls of production equipment
  • Tools and software programmes
  • Validation of special processes
  • production process variations
  • problems detected after delivery
  • procedure to define NC process and responsibilities
  • review of on-time delivery performance
  • actions based on risk assessments, and human factors.

These additional requirements are necessary for control and traceability required in the aerospace industry, which would not be met with the basic ISO9001 standard.

The official blog for independent Management Training
Consultancy, Quality Matters Limited.